Chautauqua Fellows

Chautauqua Lake

The Chautauqua Fellowship enables undergraduate students to attend a week of immersive summer programming at the Chautauqua Institution in the countryside of southwestern New York. Upon returning to ASU, fellows serve on a student advisory committee and draw on their experience to devise similar public programing tailored to the ASU community.

What is the Chautauqua Institution? 

The Chautauqua Institution is a not-for-profit, 750-acre community on Chautauqua Lake in southwestern New York state. Approximately 7,500 persons are in residence on any day during the nine-week season, and during the summer season there are over 100,000 scheduled public events.

The Institution is dedicated to the exploration of the best in human values and the enrichment of life through programming that explores the important religious, social, and political issues of our times; stimulates provocative, thoughtful involvement of individuals and families in creative response to such issues; and promotes excellence and creativity in the appreciation, performance, and teaching of the arts.

What is the summer experience like? 

The Lincoln Center for Applied Ethics hosts fellows at the Chautauqua Institution for one week of programming, and the fellowship covers travel, lodging, gate pass, and per diem while at the Institution. Fellows share a rented cottage that is minutes away from dozens of daily lectures, classes, and performances—or some lakeside recreation. 

Fellows are expected to attend the daily morning lecture on the week's theme, and come together for dinner every evening. Scroll down to see what our 2017 cohort of Chautauqua Fellows thought of their time at the Institution.

What is expected of me on the student advisory committee once I return?

The Lincoln Center for Applied Ethics is planning an inaugural, week-long Chautauqua in the spring of 2019. As experts on the Chautauqua experience, our fellows help brainstorm topics, presenters, and activities that transform the best of their experience for inclusive public audiences. Students meet regularly throughout the semester to offer their opinions and share their knowledge.

Apply now to be a 2018 Chautaqua Fellow!

Fellows in 2018 will be attending week five (7/21-7/28) of the Chautauqua Institution's programming, focused on the ethics of dissent. In that week, we’ll examine the obligations of active citizens and cultural critics, look at the role dissent has played in the development of democracy and a muscular civic dialogue, and consider how dissent has changed—in the forms it takes, how it is responded to, and the rules by which society allows or prohibits it.

You must apply via the ASU Scholarship Portal (https://scholarships.asu.edu/scholarship/91981). You will be asked to answer two writing prompts.

The first prompt is designed to examine how immersive exposure to a week of programming on the ethics of dissent will help to advance your scholarship, research, and/or personal growth:

1. "Explain how receiving a scholarship will assist you in achieving your education and career goals. Please limit your response to 3000 characters (~500 words)." 

The second prompt asks you to engage in the type of reflective exploration you will be exposed to at the Chautauqua Institution: 

2. "Describe a passion you have for a specific social issue or concern and, given the opportunity, how you would address it if you had access to resources and support. Please limit your response to 4000 characters (~650 words)."

Prior to leaving on the trip, fellows must attend two mandatory meetings: an orientation to learn more about the fellowship, and a travel planning meeting to book their travel after the awards are dispersed. All attempts will be made to ensure that these meetings align with fellows’ spring semester schedules. Recurring social mixers will also be planned so fellows can get acquainted prior to sharing lodging over the summer.

Meet our 2017 Chautauqua Fellows: 

Elizabeth Baxter

Elizabeth Baxter 

Computer Information Systems, W.P. Carey School of Business

"It isn’t every day that I have the opportunity to attend a Unitarian Universalist service, enjoy a spectacular symphony, participate in a challah baking class, try kayaking for the first time, and so much more! In addition to the diverse activities and stimulating lectures, I believe the group itself had the biggest impact on me. (I know! It sounds cheesy.) None of the six of us really knew each other before the trip, but became almost best friends right after. Despite our very different majors, we all bonded throughout the trip by exchanging our ideas, passions, and dream careers. I still keep in contact with everybody and it is amazing seeing all their incredible accomplishments."

Joseph Bianchi

Joseph Bianchi 

Science, Technology, and Society, College of Integrative Sciences & Arts

Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, New College for Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences

"The best part of the experience was being able to go for a week to a place dedicated to higher learning, essentially. The most interesting and valuable part of the Chautauqua experience was that the institution itself has such a legacy and cultural history. Being adults dropped into that academic community was the best—you get to design cultural and academic experiences that you wouldn’t otherwise."

Dena Kalamchi

Dena Kalamchi

Sociology, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences

Political Science, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences

"The most valuable part of this experience for me has to be the relationships I built with the group. I really enjoyed each and every person who joined us and have learned so much from them. Chautauqua offered an experience to really learn in a low-pressure environment and offered a great experience to learn from others and their personal interests."

Samantha Mooney

Samantha Mooney

Justice Studies, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences

"My favorite part about being at Chautauqua was the environment of the Institution. It was so great to have the lectures and dialogue of a conference in the calm, relaxing environment of the location. At the Chautauqua Institution, we were able to create the experience that we wanted. In a given day I spent the morning learning about the future and impact of Virtual Reality, my afternoon learning to interpret our dreams, another session on the Women's Land Army, and my evening listening to the Chautauqua Symphony. Whether I would attend every lecture, go kayaking on the lake, or attend a service of a denomination I didn’t know much about, Chautauqua was an environment that allowed me to reflect on perspectives of myself and society."

Luis Novelo

Luis Novelo

Biomedical Engineering, Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering

"Chautauqua provided a unique experience that was only complemented by the phenomenal group of scholars that made the trip that much more inspiring. The day was greeted with stimulating talks from keynote speakers ranging from emerging technologies to the history of invention. Freedom to explore that grounds followed the talks with ultimate flexibility in how to approach the day. The only complication was then finding enough time to attend every event of personal interest. I was pleased to find a remarkable range of events to stimulate just about every possible curiosity. Talks from a plethora of visiting researchers to compelling performances from some of the most talented musicians in the country, there was simply not enough time in the day to see it all. Even the evenings were filled to the brim with delightful events of all kinds and pleasant discussions over delicious meals with both staff and students at the residence. Each day at the Institution improved as my fellow colleagues explored the entire campus and took it all in. We each came home with a reinvigorated perspective of the world and our place in it."

Paulina Stefaniak

Paulina Stefaniak 

Political Science, College of Liberal Arts & Sciences

"I think prior to our arrival to Chautauqua, I was expecting it to be similar to a college campus with lecture halls but when I arrived, to my surprise, it was a small little community. I think the best part of this experience was attending the wide array of immersive talks that were available to us on a daily basis, especially the Google X lecture about upcoming technologies and their potential impacts on the world. I looked forward to having engaging conversations about the presentations and listening to the thoughts of my fellow scholars later in the day. I think the group of students that came on this trip were the perfect mix of “outside thinkers” and we were able to have very interesting conversations. I also enjoyed the multitude of leisure activities available to us such as canoeing, attending the Amish market, bike riding, and relaxing by the lake."