Group watching presentation
Project type: Engagement

The Endgame Project Documentary Screening

The interdisciplinary event married the humanities, arts, and science to present The Endgame Project, a documentary that traces two actors with advanced Parkinsons’ Disease as they put on the Samuel Beckett play, Endgame. The Center collaborated to bring the main actors, documentary director, and play stage manager out to screen the play and answer questions of a diverse audience that consisted of patients, caregivers, practitioners, scholars, and students.

 

Dimensions graphic

Applied Ethics Dimension

The Endgame Project documentary screening created an opportunity to network and learn across multiple sectors that included scholars, patients, caregivers, practitioners, and students. The event embedded the products of interdisciplinary research at ASU within communities of practice.

Project Description

The Lincoln Center screened The Endgame Project, a documentary that traces two actors with advanced Parkinsons’ Disease as they put on the Samuel Beckett play, Endgame. The Center collaborated to bring the main actors, documentary director, and play stage manager out to screen the play and answer questions of a diverse audience that consisted of patients, caregivers, practitioners, scholars, and students.

Impact

The Endgame Project screening connected people interested in the many ways that the arts and humanities can benefit those living with Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and other neurodegenerative conditions. The heavy involvement and participation of those impacted by Parkinsons' as both presenters and audience members helped to contextualize the human impact of those disease processes on patients, caregivers, and practitioners in ways not often discussed.

Student Engagement

Faculty across ASU encouraged their students to attend, and some accompanied groups of students, providing context for the event before the screening and leading discussion following the film. 

Collaborators / Partners

Patrick Bixby, Associate Professor in the School of Humanities, Arts and Cultural Studies led the project, and invited the panel of guests, including actors Dan Moran and John Christopher Jones, director Jim Bernfield, and stage manager Ruth Kreshka.

The ongoing product of the event is the Network for Humanities, Arts, and Neurodegenerative Care, adminstered by event director Patrick Bixby. The network connects people interested in the many ways that the arts and humanities can benefit those living with Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and other neurodegenerative conditions. It also shares projects and brings together artists, researchers, caregivers, healthcare providers, family members, and the general public.

Contact

Erica O'Neil

Engagement Lead

eloneil@asu.edu